Update 2

This use case demonstrates concurrently deploying a domain that is similar to the Update 1 use case domain to the same sample-domain1-ns namespace, but with a different domain UID, a different WebLogic domain name, and a different WebLogic domain encryption key. It does this by:

  • Using the same image, image model YAML file, and application archive as the Initial and Update 1 use cases.
  • Using the same model update ConfigMap source file as the Update 1 use case (a data source).
  • Using a different (unique) domain UID, sample-domain2, for the new domain.
  • Using a different (unique) domain name, domain2, for the different domains.
  • Deploying secrets and a model update ConfigMap that are uniquely labeled and named for the new domain.

Note that this use case shows Model in Image’s unique ability to quickly deploy a copy of a WebLogic domain that has a different WebLogic domain name and domain encryption key. This is a useful capability that is not supported by the Domain in Image domain home source type:

  • Domain in Image does not support overriding the domain name, but different domain names are necessary when two domains need to interoperate. This use case takes advantage of model macros to ensure that its two different domains have a different domain name:

    • First, you define the domain name in the model YAML file using the @@ENV:CUSTOM_DOMAIN_NAME@@ environment variable macro.
    • Second, you set the value of the CUSTOM_DOMAIN_NAME environment variable to be different using the env stanza in each Domain’s YAML file.
  • Domain in Image requires that its images embed a WebLogic security/SerializedSystemIni.dat domain encryption key that cannot be changed for the image (see Why layering matters in CI/CD considerations). This necessarily means that two Domain in Image domains that share the same image can decrypt each other’s encrypted passwords. On the other hand, a Model in Image’s domain encryption key is not embedded in the image and instead, is dynamically and uniquely created each time the domain is started.

Oracle requires interoperating WebLogic domains to have different domain names. This is necessary when two domains communicate, or when a WebLogic Server or WebLogic Java client concurrently connects to multiple domains.

Here are the steps for this use case:

  1. Make sure you have deployed the domain from the Update 1 use case.

  2. Create a ConfigMap with the WDT model that contains the data source definition.

    Run the following commands:

    $ kubectl -n sample-domain1-ns create configmap sample-domain2-wdt-config-map \
      --from-file=/tmp/mii-sample/model-configmaps/datasource
    $ kubectl -n sample-domain1-ns label configmap sample-domain2-wdt-config-map \
      weblogic.domainUID=sample-domain2
    

    If you’ve created your own data source file in the Update 1 use case, then substitute the file name in the --from-file= parameter (we suggested /tmp/mii-sample/mydatasource.yaml earlier). Note that the -from-file= parameter can reference a single file, in which case it puts the designated file in the ConfigMap, or it can reference a directory, in which case it populates the ConfigMap with all of the files in the designated directory.

    Observations:

    • We are leaving the namespace sample-domain1-ns unchanged for the ConfigMap because you will deploy domain sample-domain2 to the same namespace as sample-domain1.
    • You name and label the ConfigMap using its associated domain UID for two reasons:
      • To make it obvious which ConfigMap belongs to which domain.
      • To make it easier to clean up a domain. Typical cleanup scripts use the weblogic.domainUID label as a convenience for finding all resources associated with a domain.
    • You use a different ConfigMap for the new domain for two reasons:
      • To make it easier to keep the life cycle and/or CI/CD process for the two domains simple and independent.
      • To ‘future proof’ the new domain so that changes to the original domain or new domain’s ConfigMap can be independent.
  3. Create the secrets that are referenced by the WDT model files in the image and ConfigMap; they also will be referenced by the Domain YAML file.

    Run the following commands:

    # spec.webLogicCredentialsSecret
    $ kubectl -n sample-domain1-ns create secret generic \
      sample-domain2-weblogic-credentials \
       --from-literal=username=weblogic --from-literal=password=welcome1
    $ kubectl -n sample-domain1-ns label  secret \
      sample-domain2-weblogic-credentials \
      weblogic.domainUID=sample-domain2
    
    # spec.configuration.model.runtimeEncryptionSecret
    $ kubectl -n sample-domain1-ns create secret generic \
      sample-domain2-runtime-encryption-secret \
       --from-literal=password=my_runtime_password
    $ kubectl -n sample-domain1-ns label  secret \
      sample-domain2-runtime-encryption-secret \
      weblogic.domainUID=sample-domain2
    
    # referenced by spec.configuration.secrets and by the data source model YAML in the ConfigMap
    $ kubectl -n sample-domain1-ns create secret generic \
      sample-domain2-datasource-secret \
       --from-literal=password=Oradoc_db1 \
       --from-literal=url=jdbc:oracle:thin:@oracle-db.default.svc.cluster.local:1521/devpdb.k8s
    $ kubectl -n sample-domain1-ns label  secret \
      sample-domain2-datasource-secret \
      weblogic.domainUID=sample-domain2
    

    Observations:

    • We are leaving the namespace sample-domain1-ns unchanged for each secret because you will deploy domain sample-domain2 to the same namespace as sample-domain1.
    • You name and label the secrets using their associated domain UID for two reasons:
      • To make it obvious which secret belongs to which domain.
      • To make it easier to clean up a domain. Typical cleanup scripts use the weblogic.domainUID label as a convenience for finding all resources associated with a domain.
    • You use a different set of secrets for the new domain for two reasons:
      • To make it easier to keep the life cycle and/or CI/CD process for the two domains simple and independent.
      • To ‘future proof’ the new domain so that changes to the original domain’s secrets or new domain’s secrets can be independent.

    If you’re following the JRF path through the sample, then you also need to deploy the additional secret referenced by macros in the JRF model RCUDbInfo clause, plus an OPSS wallet password secret. For details about the uses of these secrets, see the Model in Image user documentation. Note that we are using the RCU prefix FMW2 for this domain, because the first domain is already using FMW1.

    Click here for the commands for deploying additional secrets for JRF.
  4. Set up a Domain YAML file that is similar to your Update 1 use case Domain YAML file but with a different domain UID, domain name, model update ConfigMap reference, and Secret references:

    • Option 1: Update a copy of your Domain YAML file from the Update 1 use case.

      • In the Update 1 use case, we suggested creating a file named /tmp/mii-sample/mii-update1.yaml or using the /tmp/mii-sample/domain-resources/WLS/mii-update1-d1-WLS-v1-ds.yaml file that is supplied with the sample.

        • We suggest copying this Domain YAML file and naming the copy /tmp/mii-sample/mii-update2.yaml before making any changes.

        • Working on a copy is not strictly necessary, but it helps keep track of your work for the different use cases in this sample and provides you a backup of your previous work.

      • Change the /tmp/mii-sample/mii-update2.yaml Domain YAML file name and weblogic.domainUID label to sample-domain2.

        The final result will look something like this:

        apiVersion: "weblogic.oracle/v8"
        kind: Domain
        metadata:
          name: sample-domain2
          namespace: sample-domain1-ns
          labels:
            weblogic.domainUID: sample-domain2
        

        NOTE: We are leaving the namespace sample-domain1-ns unchanged because you will be deploying domain sample-domain2 to the same namespace as sample-domain1.

      • Change the /tmp/mii-sample/mii-update2.yaml Domain YAML file’s CUSTOM_DOMAIN_NAME environment variable from domain1 to domain2.

        The model file in the image uses macro @@ENV:CUSTOM_DOMAIN_NAME@@ to reference this environment variable when setting its domain name.

        Specifically, change the corresponding Domain spec.serverPod.env YAML file stanza to look something like this:

        ...
        spec:
          ...
          serverPod:
          ...
            env:
            - name: CUSTOM_DOMAIN_NAME
              value: "domain2"
          ...
        
      • Change the /tmp/mii-sample/mii-update2.yaml Domain YAML file’s spec.domainHome value to /u01/domains/sample-domain2. The corresponding YAML file stanza will look something like this:

        ...
        spec:
          ...
          domainHome: /u01/domains/sample-domain2
          ...
        

        (This change is not strictly needed, but it is a helpful convention to decorate a WebLogic domain’s home directory with its domain name or domain UID.)

      • Change the /tmp/mii-sample/mii-update2.yaml secret references in the spec.webLogicCredentialsSecret and spec.configuration.secrets stanzas to reference this use case’s secrets. Specifically, change:

        spec:
          ...
          webLogicCredentialsSecret:
            name: sample-domain1-weblogic-credentials
          ...
          configuration:
          ...
            secrets:
            - sample-domain1-datasource-secret
            ...
            model:
              ...
              runtimeEncryptionSecret: sample-domain1-runtime-encryption-secret
        

        To this:

        spec:
          ...
          webLogicCredentialsSecret:
            name: sample-domain2-weblogic-credentials
          ...
          configuration:
            ...
            secrets:
            - sample-domain2-datasource-secret
            ...
            model:
              ...
              runtimeEncryptionSecret: sample-domain2-runtime-encryption-secret
        

        NOTE: If you are following the JRF path through the sample, similarly change your spec.configuration.opss.walletPasswordSecret and the RCU secret name referenced in spec.configuration.secrets.

      • Change the Domain YAML file’s spec.configuration.model.configMap value from sample-domain1-wdt-config-map to sample-domain2-wdt-config-map. The corresponding YAML file stanza will look something like this:

        spec:
          ...
          configuration:
            ...
            model:
            ...
              configMap: sample-domain2-wdt-config-map
        
      • Now, compare your original and changed Domain YAML files to double check your changes.

        $ diff /tmp/mii-sample/mii-update1.yaml /tmp/mii-sample/mii-update2.yaml
        9c9
        <   name: sample-domain1
        ---
        >   name: sample-domain2
        13c13
        <     weblogic.domainUID: sample-domain1
        ---
        >     weblogic.domainUID: sample-domain2
        21c21
        <   domainHome: /u01/domains/sample-domain1
        ---
        >   domainHome: /u01/domains/sample-domain2
        36c36
        <     name: sample-domain1-weblogic-credentials
        ---
        >     name: sample-domain2-weblogic-credentials
        46c46
        <   #logHome: /shared/logs/sample-domain1
        ---
        >   #logHome: /shared/logs/sample-domain2
        61c61
        <       value: "domain1"
        ---
        >       value: "domain2"
        71c71
        <     #    claimName: sample-domain1-weblogic-sample-pvc
        ---
        >     #    claimName: sample-domain2-weblogic-sample-pvc
        110c110
        <       configMap: sample-domain1-wdt-config-map
        ---
        >       configMap: sample-domain2-wdt-config-map
        113c113
        <       runtimeEncryptionSecret: sample-domain1-runtime-encryption-secret
        ---
        >       runtimeEncryptionSecret: sample-domain2-runtime-encryption-secret
        118c118
        <     - sample-domain1-datasource-secret
        ---
        >     - sample-domain2-datasource-secret
        
        Click here to see additional 'diff' expected for the JRF path through the sample.

        NOTE: The diff should not contain a namespace change. You are deploying domain sample-domain2 to the same namespace as sample-domain1 (namespace sample-domain1-ns).

      • Apply your changed Domain YAML file:

        Note: Before you deploy the Domain YAML file, determine if you have Kubernetes cluster worker nodes that are remote to your local machine. If so, you need to put the Domain’s image in a location that these nodes can access and you may also need to modify your Domain YAML file to reference the new location. See Ensuring your Kubernetes cluster can access images.

        $ kubectl apply -f /tmp/mii-sample/mii-update2.yaml
        
    • Option 2: Use the updated Domain YAML file that is supplied with the sample:

      Note: Before you deploy the Domain YAML file, determine if you have Kubernetes cluster worker nodes that are remote to your local machine. If so, you need to put the Domain’s image in a location that these nodes can access and you may also need to modify your Domain YAML file to reference the new location. See Ensuring your Kubernetes cluster can access images.

      $ kubectl apply -f /tmp/miisample/domain-resources/WLS/mii-update2-d2-WLS-v1-ds.yaml
      
  5. Wait for sample-domain2 to start.

    If you run kubectl get pods -n sample-domain1-ns --watch, then you will see the introspector job for sample-domain2 run and your WebLogic Server pods start. The output will look something like this:

    Click here to expand.

    For a more detailed view of this activity, you can instead call /tmp/mii-sample/utils/wl-pod-wait.sh -n sample-domain1-ns -d sample-domain2 -p 3. The output will look something like this:

    Click here to expand.
  6. After the sample-domain2 domain is running, you can call its sample web application to verify that it’s fully active.

    Send a web application request to the ingress controller for sample-domain2:

    $ curl -s -S -m 10 -H 'host: sample-domain2-cluster-cluster-1.mii-sample.org' \
       http://localhost:30305/myapp_war/index.jsp
    

    Or, if Traefik is unavailable and your domain2 Administration Server pod is running, you can run kubectl exec:

    $ kubectl exec -n sample-domain1-ns sample-domain2-admin-server -- bash -c \
      "curl -s -S -m 10 http://sample-domain2-cluster-cluster-1:8001/myapp_war/index.jsp"
    

    You will see something like the following:

    <html><body><pre>
    *****************************************************************
    
    Hello World! This is version 'v1' of the mii-sample JSP web-app.
    
    Welcome to WebLogic Server 'managed-server1'!
    
     domain UID  = 'sample-domain2'
     domain name = 'domain2'
    
    Found 1 local cluster runtime:
      Cluster 'cluster-1'
    
    Found 1 local data source:
      Datasource 'mynewdatasource': State='Running'
    
    *****************************************************************
    </pre></body></html>
    
    

If you see an error, then consult Debugging in the Model in Image user guide.

You will not be using the sample-domain2 domain again in this sample; if you wish, you can shut it down now by calling kubectl -n sample-domain1-ns delete domain sample-domain2.

To remove the resources you have created in the samples, see Cleanup.